Bond

Bonds are units of corporate debt issued by companies and securitized as tradeable assets.

A bond is referred to as a fixed income instrument since bonds traditionally paid a fixed interest rate (coupon) to debt holders. Variable or floating interest rates are also now quite common.

Bond prices are inversely correlated with interest rates: when rates go up, bond prices fall and vice-versa.

Bonds have maturity dates at which point the principal amount must be paid back in full or risk default.

Categories of Bonds:

There are four primary categories of bonds sold in the markets. However, you may also see foreign bonds issued by corporations and governments on some platforms.

  • Corporate bonds are issued by companies. Companies issue bonds rather than seek bank loans for debt financing in many cases because bond markets offer more favorable terms and lower interest rates.
  • Municipal bonds are issued by states and municipalities. Some municipal bonds offer tax-free coupon income for investors.
  • Government bonds such as those issued by the U.S. Treasury. Bonds issued by the Treasury with a year or less to maturity are called “Bills”; bonds issued with 1–10 years to maturity are called “notes”; and bonds issued with more than 10 years to maturity are called “bonds”. The entire category of bonds issued by a government treasury is often collectively referred to as "treasuries." Government bonds issued by national governments may be referred to as sovereign debt.
  • Agency bonds are those issued by government-affiliated organizations such as Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.