Property Insurance

Property insurance provides financial reimbursement to the owner or renter of a structure and its contents in case there is damage or theft—and to a person other than the owner or renter if that person is injured on the property.

Perils covered by property insurance typically include select weather-related afflictions, including damage caused by fire, smoke, wind, hail, the impact of snow and ice, lightning, and more. Property insurance also protects against vandalism and theft, covering the structure and its contents. Property insurance also provides liability coverage in case someone other than the property owner or renter is injured while on the property and decides to sue.

Understanding Property Insurance:

There are three types of property insurance coverage: replacement cost, actual cash value, and extended replacement costs.

  • Replacement cost covers the cost of repairing or replacing property at the same or equal value. The coverage is based on replacement cost values rather than the cash value of items.
  • Actual cash value coverage pays the owner or renter the replacement cost minus depreciation. If the destroyed item is 10 years old, you get the value of a 10-year-old item, not a new one.
  • Extended replacement costs will pay more than the coverage limit if the costs for construction have gone up; however, this usually won't exceed 25% of the limit. When you buy insurance, the limit is the maximum amount of benefit the insurance company will pay for a given situation or occurrence.